Finding Meaning in Art

A new art installation focusing on local people’s experience of lockdown has been unveiled at Chester Cathedral.

Finding meaning in lockdown through art in cathedrals

The Chester Cathedral Community Cross initiative invited businesses and local communities in the city centre to convey what lockdown meant to them using any materials and any creative means they wished and display it on a small wooden plaque which are attached to the cross on display in the cathedral.

Chester Cathedral Vice Dean, Canon Jane Brooke said:

“The pandemic and subsequent lockdown affected people in many different ways, bringing negativity and positivity, fear, loneliness, togetherness, heartache and joy.

“I am delighted that so many people engaged with this project. When viewing the cross, we hope visitors can empathise with the experiences of those represented on the cross.”

The Community Cross remains on display in Chester Cathedral until Tuesday 29 September.

Over three thousand people have visited Exeter Cathedral to see the touring art installation, The Leaves of the Tree designed to give people the opportunity to reflect on the impact the Coronavirus pandemic has had on them and their communities.

The Leaves of the Trees is made up of 5,000 steel leaves, each featuring the word ‘HOPE’ and
was created by sculptor, Peter Walker, who said the leaves were symbolic of the times we were living in.

The Dean of Exeter, the Very Revd Jonathan Greener, said:

“We are delighted to be the first to host Peter Walker’s new installation, which will bring a new way of helping visitors to remember loved ones and contemplate all that has happened over the last few months.”

The installation can be seen at Exeter Cathedral until 24 September. It opens in Sheffield on 3 October – 29 October and then visits Lichfield Cathedral where Peter is the Artistic Director and Artist in Residence. It will travel to Rochester Cathedral next year.

Art in Cathedrals During Lockdown

The installation is supported by the Guild of Health and St Raphael